8.24.2015

SARASOTA MODERN

Deering House in Casey Key, FL. Designed by Paul Rudolph, 1958. Photography Ezra Stoller.

Leavengood House in St. Petersburg, FL. Designed by Paul Rudolph & Ralph Twitchell, 1951. Photography Ezra Stoller.

Healy Guest House, aka the "Cocoon House" in Siesta Key, Sarasota, FL. Designed by Paul Rudolph & Ralph Twitchell, 1950. Photography Ezra Stoller.

Sarasota Modern, a regional style of post-war architecture that emerged on Florida's Central West Coast, is characterized by its attention to climate and terrain. Large sunshades, innovative ventilation systems, oversized sliding glass doors, floating staircases, and walls of jalousie windows dominate many of these buildings, mostly built between 1941 and 1966.
All of the above houses were designed by architect Paul Rudolph who moved to Sarasota after his Harvard studies, and partnered with Ralph Twitchell for four years until he started his own practice in 1952.

Photos via Ezra Stoller

More houses by Paul Rudolph here

8.06.2015

FAREWELL IRVING HARPER

Irving Harper (July 14, 1916 - August 4, 2015) went to school to pursue his dream of becoming an architect, but since he graduated during the Depression from New York's Cooper Union, there weren't any jobs, so he ended up moving into industrial design. From 1947 to 1963 he worked as a design director for the George Nelson Office and became one of the key creatives behind the look of Herman Miller designing the company's logo and advertisements (despite not being trained in graphic design). His creations such as the 1949 Ball Clock and the 1956 Marshmallow sofa, shaped and defined the style we know today as Midcentury Modern.

IRVING HARPER'S LOGO FOR HERMAN MILLER, 1947.
   
IRVING HARPER'S MAGAZINE ADVERTISMENT, 1948.
 
IRVING HARPER'S MAGAZINE ADVERTISMENT, 1949.
 
IRVING HARPER'S MAGAZINE ADVERTISEMENT FOR INTERIORS, 1950.
 
IRVING HARPER'S MAGAZINE ADVERTISEMENT FOR INTERIORS, 1952.
 
IRVING HARPER'S MAGAZINE ADVERTISEMENT, 1952.
 
IRVING HARPER'S MAGAZINE ADVERTISEMENT FOR INTERIORS, 1960.
 
In 1964, Harper left Nelson's company to start his own business. He retired in 1983 and began focusing on his sculpture work. He would often use simple construction paper and Elmer's glue to create his complex sculptures, the last of which came in 2000 - when he claimed he ran out of room to put them inside his house. After decades of keeping his designs private, Harper agreed to display his sculptures at The Rye Arts Center gallery.

resources:
Irving Harper: The Mediums Beyond the Message
The Colorful Career of Irving Harper, Famed Herman Miller Designer
Legendary Rye artist Irving Harper dies at 99

8.05.2015

VLS HOUSE ANTIPAROS

August is here and in these warm days I find this breathtaking villa designed by Nicos Valsamakis to be the ideal summer house! 

Read more about Valsamakis' work on this older post.

Photos by Mads Mogensen via Bo Bedre